Marks & Spencer

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Marks & Spencer

M&S came to Coventry in 1929. The ancient buildings of 12,13 & 13a Smithford Street were demolished. The chapel at the rear on Vicar Lane was incorporated into the new store.

The Corporation was developing plans to widen the street – so the new store had a ‘false front’ that could be removed in the future. Shoplifting was a common occurrence. In 1940 like most of the city the store was destroyed.

1929

Councillor Grindlay asked

“Who are Marks and Spencer and what is the nature of their business?”

(This was met with laughter at the meeting).

Alderman Batchelor replied

“Similar to Woolworths, but they don’t restrict themselves to sixpenny articles.”

The plan – temporary and permanent building erected on the site of No 12, 13, and 13a Smithford Street by Marks and Spencer Ltd (approved by the general Works Committee).

Vicar Lane corner will be splayed off so as to facilitate vehicular traffic between Smithford Street and the Lane. Mark’s and Spencer will be allowed to build a ‘temporary’ frontage on Smithford Street paying rent to the Corporation on lands for at least 10 years. Later the land will be used for street widening. Designed by Mr A. E. Blatzer of London at a cost of £300,000 to £400,000. The cost is expected between

12, 13 and 13a Smithford Street currently occupied by Hat manufacturing Company Ltd, J T Moy and Son Ltd and Broadway Tailors.

In 1927 a notice of dilapidation was served on Moy.

During the demolition of the final wall of the building immediately behind the premises of Messrs Marks and Spencer was commenced a hidden room was found.

The wall concerned was the furthest from the proposed arcade, and was unusually smooth and upright. It contained a fireplace. When the wall was knocked down it revealed another fireplace of older brickwork behind it. The most peculiar feature of the affair is the fact that there is a space of at least five feet between the two walls making, in reality, a secret apartment.

That this was ever inhabited is doubtful. However, because the place was sealed up entirely as it probably had been for centuries.

[Here’s a guess – Could this have been a Priest Hole?]

Marks and Spencer Ltd have decided to pay an interim dividend of 10% actual less tax on the ordinary and “A” ordinary shares of this company on account of the year ending 31st March 1931.

March – Dorothy Emeline was charged with the theft of a child’s pleated skirt value 2s 11d from Marks & Spencers stores on Saturday. She was placed on probation for six months.

June – Jeannie Wright (36) married – 41 Cow Lane sent to prison for 3 months for stealing razor Blades valued at 3s 6d from Marks & Spencer.

September – Theft of a lady’s skirt valued at 4s 11d Florence Marriott 23 Holbrook Lane was seen by the shop assistant of taking the skirt from a stall, put it under her coat and walk out. The store manager said the woman told him she had no money and she thought she could sell the skirt. The woman had four children and a husband who was unemployed. The bench gave her another chance – probation for six months.

July – Alice Worth found guilty of theft of many items from the Co-Op Woolworths and Marks & Spencers fined £4 and imprisoned for 28 days.

May – Rosa Harriet Tams – Housewife 56 took three tomatoes, one wash leather and ladies underclothing valued at 9s 10d from Marks and Spencer’s. Wife and mother of grown-up children. The family are all of good character – she did not know why she did it.  Bound over in the sum of £5 for six months.

1934

June – Women’s Charity Cricket Match to raise funds for the hospital – Marks & Spencer staff vs Woolworths staff. Woolworth’s girls in white jerseys and shorts – Marks and Spencer girls white shirts and grey shorts.

August – Robert Stanley Stainer charged with stealing two Men’s shirts from Marks and Spencers.

October – Ada Wykes Housekeeper in Tile Hill stole two lady’s dresses, a lady’s handbag and an umbrella.

February – Why Not become a club holder? Spare time work earns a generous commission and helps your income considerably. No clerical worries, everting simple and straightforward. Satisfaction guaranteed – Apply at the Club Desk. Marks and Spencer Store 12-13 Smithford Street Coventry. 

September – Thomas Cooley found guilty of stealing six pocket wallets, a tobacco pouch, a purse, an alarm clock, boot polish and soap. 

1936

November – One man sentenced to hard labour for 28 days and fines imposed on four women for stealing from Marks & Spencer. 

Alfred George Denscombe steam wagon driver stole four pairs of gents kid gloves and two mufflers to the value of £1, 3s 6d – he had served 13 terms in imprisonment the last in 1923. Two housewives – Jane Baldwin, Sarah Bond both charged with stealing boys boots, a pair of child’s shoes, half a pound of tea and various other articles to a value of 12s 8d both were fined £1. Mrs Florence Pratt and her daughter Mrs Bertha Howe were charged with stealing two shirts and a doll to the value of 8s 10 and were both fined £1. 

The store has now been compelled to hire a store detective to put a stop to all the pilfering!

1937

April – Magistrate remarks:

“Maybe somethings should be done about the number of cases stores like Marks & Spencers bring to the courts.

The modern way of shopping in putting goods in temptation of the public may in part encourage this kind of unfortunate behaviour!”

April – Harriett Ingham widow charged with stealing shoes valued at 5s. let off with a  caution.

June – Maud McPherson charged with stealing goods to the value of 12s from Marks & Spencer and Woolworths. 

June – Ellen Potts charged with stealing a handbag – the store detective had seen her drop the handbag into a larger bag. Pleaded guilty and let off. 

June – Agnes McGuiness (29), Elsie Alton (18) and mary Bonder (17) charged with stealing three umbrellas, one pair of shoes, one child’s dress, two pairs of artificial silk knickers, one artificial silk scarf, one jar of face cream to a value of £1, 6s. The older woman fined 40s the other two fined 20s. 

November – Adelaide Jean Morris (21) charged with stealing gloves, scarves, slippers, a handbag, handkerchiefs, fountain pen, soap, tinned food, biscuits, a broach and toothpaste. Fined £3. 

November – Catherine Sarah Ann Stanley (39) charged with stealing lady’s gloves, a pair of child’s cloves a handbag, and ring. Fined £1

January – Beatrice Minshall (50) charged with stealing various articles. Fined 40s.

February – Initiative across the city shop traders to reduce opening times. Marks & Spencer along with Woolworth’s will now close at 8:30 pm on Saturdays rather than 9 pm to reduce the hour’s shop assistants need to work.

April – Violet Morgan (36) – Charged with shoplifting. 

May – Ellen Eliza Rushton (60) stole a pair of ladies fabric gloves and a tube of face cream. She said “since she had lost her daughter she had lost herself”. Fined £2.

May – Elizabeth Blackett (41) stole a pair of ladies gloves, a pot of sandwich paste and one tine of fruit. Her Doctor said she was of good standing – about a year ago her husband had met with a serious pit accident and since then she herself had gone out to work, but struggled due to illness. Probation for 12 months. ​

October – Mary Ainley found guilty of sealing a number of items. Fined 40s. Phyllis Edith Manning and Elsie May Hare both fined 40s for theft of various items. 

November – Violet Helen Simpson (44) stole a handbag fined £1. 

November – Doris Evely Ashby (18) stole various items – probation for 12 months. 

December – Over seven children lost their parents in the store and were cared for by the staff – a similar situation has arisen Woolworths. Owen and Owen have made special provision with an area near the bureau office with children’s books to keep lost children occupied while they wait for their parents. 

1938

October – Edith Anne Parr (50) Widow and her daughter Margaret Jane Rogers (28) found guilty of stealing a number of items – all black. They were stolen for a funeral. The magistrate whilst sympathetic said it was no excuse and fined them each £2. ​

January – City Fire Brigade Called to Marks and Spencer within the city danger zone at 8.40 by the watchman who saw smoke emerging from behind the refrigerator on the cooked meats counter. The firemen who turned out with two machines found the electric motor of the refrigerator was on fire. This was promptly dealt with by chemical extinguishers – no damage was caused except to the motor which was burnt out.

February – Elsie Evelyn Walker (35) stole men’s kid’s gloves – fined £1. 

March – Annie Evely Ledbetter (38) May Kathleen Page (39) stole child’s dresses, a lady’s dress, a cardigan, two jerseys, a blouse and four torches. Each fined £1.

March – Annual Marks and Spencer Dance. 

July – Staff raise £3, 5s for War effort – Marks and Spencer corporate donate £2.

July – Lily Picken (35) fined £5 for stealing various items with the help of an 11-year-old boy who was put on 12-months probation. 

August – Mary Colquhoun , Isabel McPheators, Mary Ann Waugh and Jane Aqnew were all found guilty of theft. Each fined between £1, 10s and £3. 

August – Elsie Nora Mansell (30) pleaded guilty to theft of a pair of sandals, two pairs of ladies gloves and a lady’s skirt. Fined £2. 

September – Mrs Mary Elizabeth Fellows fined £2 for theft of a suit. 

September – Lily Jamieson (29) stole shoes and a vest – fined £2

November – Dorothy Hurt (38) stole jars of jam, fish paste, clothing and a loaf of bread. When apprehended in the store she said – I have plenty of money, and I would have paid for them if the young woman assistant had only asked me for the money. When arrested she was found with £10 in her possession. She had been in the city only a few weeks, having come from Wales. Her husband was in work and there was no excuse for her behaviour. As she stood crying in the dock “I didn’t want to take them, I don’t want the things and I don’t know what made me do it.  I have never done anything like that before”. She was fined 20s.

1940

November 14th – The Coventry Marks & Spencer Store is destroyed in the Coventry Blitz. 

(more to come..)

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Marks & Spencer

Coventry Arms

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Coventry Arms

The central landmark in Broadgate. Demolished in the 1920s to make way for the National Provincial Bank. During the demolition stone from Coventry Castle / Cathedral was reportedly found, along with a 14th Century fireplace that was hidden under wooden panelling.

The panelling was later used to restore St Mary’s Guild Hall in the 1930s. Named the Coventry Arms by at least 1903. Below is a potted history of the last 25 years of its life.

Wanted a girl about 14 as Nurse Girl. Apply Newman “Coventry Arms”, Smithford Street, Coventry.

2nd September Coventry Motor and Cycle Carnival – 4th Annual parade committee meet at the Coventry Arms to discuss the next event planned for October.

 

14th October  Committee meet again. The plan – Assembly in the Barrack Square at 5 o’clock. Judging at 5.30. Three stoppages bottom of Holyhead Road, corner of Lower Ford Street and Raglan Street and top of Bishop Street. Money collectors  – Boxes may be obtained from the Coventry Arms, the offices

9th March Second Hand Bicycle Wanted: must be in good condition and cheap. Apply Coventry Arms Smithford Street.

1906

 28th September – Fire at the Craven Arms Stables, Mr Walter Newman the landlord of the Coventry Arms helped move a cab, but slipped and sprained his ankle. (History of the Craven Arms coming soon, including the fire and the fire Brigades Peeping Tom Engine).

2nd January – Tickets for Coventry City F.C. and the Match with Crystal Palace – available from the Coventry Arms.

28th July Mr Walter Newman licensee of the Coventry Arms runs for the Guardians Vacancy Radford Ward on the Coventry Board of Guardians.

7th OctoberLicensing committee agree to the transfer of the licence from Mr Walter Newman to Mr Thomas Strong.

12th November – Tickets for the Grand Northern Union Football Match in Coventry – St Helens vs Hull. kick off at 3 pm.

3rd May – Coventry Northern Union Football Club First Annual Meeting held at the Coventry Arms.

6th October – Celebrating the first win of the Coventry Northern Union F.C. Mr Strong hosts an evening of entertainment for the Coventry players. 

13th February – Bar General Wanted experienced and good references required. Coventry Arms, Broadgate.

10th February – Inter-club Matches: Believed to be Billiards – Southam Coronation Club vs Coventry Arms Hotel. At Southam on Monday evening the victors winning by six points. Socres –

Southam: Dr Ormenrod 100, W.C. Collier 100, F.G. Watson 100, W.H. Plummer 80, A.Martin 85, Lt. Tuson 100, Dr Lattey 46. Total 611 

Coventry Arms T.Strong 86, H.G. Tett 70, E. Ingham 86, H Burton 100,  E. Venn 100, Vz. Ranford 75, T Watson 100, Total 627.

8th April Good Bar General Wanted – reference required Coventry Arms Broadgate.

11th – 26th June Young Girl daily to take children out – Mrs Jeffrey Coventry Arms.

25th February Bar General Wanted also general to assist in bar when required – Coventry Arms Broadgate.

23rd February – Fire Brigades Meeting held at the Coventry Arms.

1916

28th August Married lady with baby, requires bed and sitting-room furnished – Apply Coventry Arms Broadgate.

23rd – 26th April – Girl wanted for housework and assist bar Coventry Arms, Broadgate.

19th August – Lost black and white cat answers name, Billy. Reward to be given to anyone returning to Coventry Arms, Coventry.

10th October – Bar General Wanted, also Cook General Coventry Arms, Coventry.

1918

12th July – Gertrude Driver, munition worker stole a pair of scissors valued at 2s 3d the property of the Ministry of Munitions. Miss Driver was further summoned for receiving from a person unknown a metal tankard value 10s belonging to Thomas Strong of the Coventry Arms Coventry. She stated that she went to have a drink, and a man handed her the mug. Miss Driver refused to take it from the man, but when on the tramcar the man offered it to her again she put it on her lap. For the theft the girl was fined 25s and costs.

12th March – Mr Strong objects to a restaurant “Black Cat” 56-57 Hertford Street having an alcohol licence. Other objectors included Mr Nelson on behalf of the Coventry and District Licensed Victuallers Association, Mr Wilford the licensees of the Railway Inn, Mr H I Mander on behalf of the Coventry District Free Church Council and the Coventry Branch of the British Women’s Temperance Association. Who would want to drink alcohol while eating a meal at a restaurant?

29th May – Girl Wanted for housework and assist bar in evenings Coventry Arms Broadgate.

1919

5th July – Mr Strong (land lord of the Coventry Arms) charged with driving a motor car at speed dangerous to the public in Greyfriars Lane, Smithford Street and Broadgate, on the night of June 19th 1919. Mr Strong was reported to be driving near Broadgate at 10-30 pm on June 19th. Coming out from Greyfriars Lane with full lights burning at a terrible speed. The engine was roaring and all out, and apparently travelling on the second or third gear.

The car just missed the lamp standard on the opposite side of the road, knocked down a man, continued at a wild pace turned around and finished inside Herford Street. Estimated speed: twenty to twenty-five miles an hour. Witnesses had to move away sharply to prevent being knocked down. Mr Strong had only been driving a car for five weeks, and on this night put his foot on the accelerator instead of the brake. The consequence was that the more he applied pressure to what he thought was the brake and greater was the speed of the car.

There was no doubt the estimate of the speed was exaggerated, but the incident did scatter the crowd. It was a pure accident and not a question of wilful misconduct or careless driving.

Defendant bore out his solicitor’s statement and said that when he saw the people he was excited and nervous and thought he did quite well to miss the people as he did. The case was found proved, though the magistrates accepted the defendant’s explanation. A fine of £10 was imposed £1 5s special costs.

17th February – Woman (daily) Wanted for cooking and house work; also Girl for Housework and assist bar, lie in Coventry – Coventry Arms.

1923

30th July – Coventry Police Court: Mr Marson (Ironmonger) had ‘two’ drinks on Saturday 20th July in the Coventry Arms. At 2:15 pm the police were called to eject him for being drunk and disorderly. It took four officers to remove Mr Marson to the police station, St Marys Street. The police report he was very drunk, using filthy language. During his ejection one of the officer’s trousers were torn beyond repair. During his night in the cell, Mr Marson caused considerable damage. Local reports suggest Mr Marson had sadly turned to drink in recent years.

The Bench considered Mr Marson’s position in the city as well-known trades man for some years, decided to be lenient. For being drunk and disorderly he would be fined 40s and for the damage he would have to pay a fine of £5 in addition to the damage of (£10, 16s 6d).

12th April – Temporary licence transfer of the “The Coventry Arms” Smithford Street from Thomas Strong to Edward Reynolds.

14th May  – Good cook general required; good references Evenings off – Apply Coventry Arms Broadgate.

29th May – Licencing Justice: Application to extend hours of opening for city centre public houses. Estimated that 1,000 to 1,500 country people visited Coventry on Friday afternoons. Of which 200 or 300 are farmers resulting in a good deal of money being spent with the tradesmen.

5th July – Lost black and white fox terrier information or return to Coventry arms, Broadgate, Coventry.

2nd September – Bar General wanted must be used to business. Good references essential apply Coventry Arms Broadgate.

4th October – Lost white wire-haired Fox Terrier puppy. Name “Roy” Finder rewarded, return to Coventry Arms, Broadgate.

15th October – Barmaid (Smart) wanted week-ends Fridays and Saturdays Apply Coventry Arms Broadgate.

25th November – Bar General wanted. Good home and wages, must be used to business. Closed Sundays references essential Apply Coventry Arms Broadgate.

3rd November – Cook General (good) wanted; good home and wages – Apply Coventry Arms, Broadgate.

27th November – Bar General wanted, good home and wages, must be used to business. Closed Sundays references essential – Apply Coventry Arms Broadgate.

It was requested that the hours of opening be from 2.30 pm to 4.30 pm on each first day afternoon which coincided approximately with the times of the arrival and departure of the farmers. The facility would be treated as a privilege and would not be abused in any way.

22nd / 23rd July – Agricultural show held in Coventry. Pubs in town including the Coventry Arms allowed to open 2pm – 6pm. Last time the show came to Coventry was five years previously.

3rd February – Barmaid wanted weekends , quick trade – Apply Coventry Arms.

4th May – Bar General wanted, wages £1 per week live in, closed Sundays good references essential apply Coventry Arms.

27th June – Aftermath of the carnival – Mrs F. Wallace was trying to climb on to one of the window sills outside the Coventry Arms in order to get a good view of the Carnival Procession, when she slipped and fell to the ground cutting her head. She was detained in Hospital.

23rd September – Cook General wanted must be good plain cook. Wanted £1 week live in references required Apply Coventry Arms.

19th December – Coventry Arms allowed to open at 5 pm next Thursday instead of 6 pm on the occasion o Waratahs’ match with Warwickshire. – What’s the Waratah’s match? – click here for Wikki page.

13th April – The Brewers plan to pay £2,000 to the corporation to surrender The Coventry Arms licence.

21st June – Bar General Wanted, experienced, smart and quick. Wages £1 weekly. Closed Sundays good references essential – Apply Coventry Arms Broadgate, Coventry.

10th July – Bar General wanted experienced, smart and quick. Good references essential. Wages £1 week. Closed Sunday – Apply Coventry Arms Broadgate.

11th September – Demolition of Johnson and Mason’s Premises behind Coventry Arms on Hertford Street in progress. Great difficulty will be experienced in taking down the front portion of the premises which is fifty feet high. Messrs W.H. Jones and Son of Lockhurst lane await the ‘ownership’ of the Coventry Arms.

In the foundations of Messrs Johnson and Mason’s a number of building stones have been found that are thought to belong to the Coventry Castle of ancient days or the old monastery which was destroyed by Henry VIII.

15th October – Magistrates Court listing of a case for possession of the Coventry Arms. Case labelled “Mayor & Corporation of Coventry Vs. Edward Reynolds” The case was dropped before it was heard in court.

29th October – Corporation takes possession of the Coventry Arms pub portion. Possession of the dwelling areas to be taken on the 5th November.

1928

2nd March – Corporation in negotiations with owners to purchase the property for street widening. The General Works Committee Invites Tenders for Demolition of the Coventry Arms & National Provincial Bank Premises Smithford Street.

Demolition - Coventry Arms

November 1928

1928

7th November – The famed 17th-century oak panelling in one of the ground floor rooms is to be carefully removed for safe keeping. The woodwork includes a huge carved oak fireplace reaching from the floor to ceiling with the date 1621.

When the panelling was removed, a 14th century carved stone fireplace was uncovered in marvellous condition. Approximately 9ft 6″ high, 8ft 6″ wide, with a depth of 12″. Originally constructed with an open hearth, with a wide chimney. The open fireplace allowed for approximately 4ft high and about 8ft wide. Above the fireplace, there is a carved frieze approximately 8ft wide, 2ft 6″ high 10″ thick. Containing five panels each with a shield, upon traces of coats of arms can be seen. The central panel contains a carved figure of an ecclesiastical character. The fire place obviously came from a building of great wealth and importance.

Above the frieze is a wide stone recess, providing a stone shelf while along the top is a further stone lintel containing handsome mouldings, with a further central figure that has a bearded and folded arms. Unfortunately the concentrated heat upon one side of the fireplace has crumbled the stonework. The stone fireplace is to be carefully removed.

A second discovery – In the room above there was a second oak panelled apartment. Again when the panelling was removed second stone fireplace was discovered, situated immediately above the one already described. Though somewhat similar in size the upstairs fireplace is not so lavishly ornamented as the lower one. It is 9ft high 6ft 2 in wide and has a carved frieze rail 1ft 6 inch high. The panel is diamond shaped about 11 inches square also containing shields. The coats of arms and a gild lion can be clearly seen.

8th November A party from the Corporation, including the Mayor inspected the wonderful old carved stone fireplaces discovered in the “Coventry Arms” demolition.

Coventry Arms is no more...

1928 13th December Lost white fox terrier Dog address collar Coventry Arms Broadgate please return to 2 St Osburgs Road or Police Station – Reward.

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Coventry Arms

Kings Head Hotel

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King's Head Hotel

The Kings Head Inn was an important coaching house in the centre of Coventry. In the late Victorian period it was transformed into a grand hotel. later, in the 1930s it was updated and destroyed in 1940.

May – Saturday 7th  Kings Head Assembly Room, King’s Head Inn, a selection of music will be played by Master and Miss Smith.

The boy is 7 and the girl is 5. They will play the violin, piano-forte and musical glasses. To begin at 7pm, tickets 2s 6d each, children half price. Tickets from Mr Smith at the George Inn, Little Park Street. Also available from the Herald newspaper offices, Coventry.

1823

The Duke of Wellington visited Coventry and stayed at the Kings Head.

July – Mr Green, a balloonist accompanied by a young lady made his nineteenth assistant in his magnificent balloon from Warwick to Lutterworth. Mr Green and his intrepid assistant packed up their balloon and travelled back to Warwick.

On root, they changed their horses at the Kings’ Head, Coventry. The next day the following poem was published in the paper by a Coventry local ..

“Green, who rides above the clouds, and makes the people wonder, might soon be wrapped in a shroud, by one loud clap of thunder; ‘T’woud send his air balloon in twain, and send him headlong down again.”

November – Warwickshire Agricultural society Committee Meeting held at the Kings Head Coventry to discuss prizes for the year, and other business. The committee will be happy to see any of the members of the society – dinner on the table at 3 o clock. 

December 1st – Richard Crane charged with stealing from Mr Williamson, the King’s Head Coventry. Mr James Williamson, the Landlord of the Kings Head Coventry, identified the property [including a spoon and a plate bought from the predecessor in the Kings Head]

September – Warwickshire agricultural society will meet Friday 6th October next in a field near the village of Baginton. A competition for Ploughing will take place. The hedging and ditching competitions will be in a field in the occupation of Mr Robbins, about half a mile distant between Baginton and Stoneleigh Park. After the committee will meet at 2 pm at the Kings Head Coventry for dinner and to arrange the competitions for the next year. Dinner on the table at three o clock.

1849

16th March – The Kings Head Inn, Coventry to be let, with immediate possession at a very moderate rent.

The Kings Head family hotel, commercial and posting house, established upwards of a century and situated in the centre of the city of Coventry. In the immediate locality of the Coventry station of the London and northwestern railway to and from which there is an omnibus belonging to the inn. Comprising of 30 good sized lofty chambers and servants bedrooms, nine sitting, drawing and dining rooms of large dimensions and equal in comfort to any private apartments. Market room, 49 feet by 16 feet 6 inches, commercial room, well-constructed bar, tap, coach office, the usual description of domestic offices.

A superior arched cellaring [given the location the cellar could be very old – the 14th century?], adapted for wholesale stores, an extensive range of coach-houses, stabling, granaries and requisite outbuildings.

The tenant may be accommodated with the valuable and appropriate Household Furniture, Wines, Horse and other effects at a fair valuation. For a view apply on the premises and for any further particulatrs and to read, to Messrs Woodcock, Twist and Son Solicitors or Messrs. Brown & Clarke, Auctioneers, Coventry.

1849

19th December – Charles Sabin Most respectfully informs his friends that his House Warming Dinner will take place on Wednesday at the Kings Head.

N.B. Dinner at half past four o’clock.

November – Clergy meeting of the Archdeaconry of Coventry – A meeting of the Clergy of the Archdeaconry of Coventry was held at the King’s Head Coventry. Upwards of 300 were present more than any similar meeting in the memory of the oldest member of that body. Point of discussion – that so-called bishop of Birmingham..

January – Warwickshire Scripture Readers Association Annual Meeting held at the Kings Head.

October – Charles Sabin (Landlord 1848 – 1851) Begs to thank his friends and the public in general for their kind patronage and wishes to inform them that the business of the hotel will be carried on as usual. N.B. Post horses, cars, gig & close boxes and lock-up coach houses.

March – County Fire Office London annual county meeting.

April – Coventry Election: Kings Head Coventry 10 o’clock Friday  Electors and freemen of Coventry.

September – Rams for Sale – 10 Purebred Shropshire Yearling Rams

August – Pollution of Rivers  – A meeting was held at the Kings Head to discuss what measures could be taken to abate the nuisance arising from the sewage of the city of Coventry being emptied into the rivers Sherbourne, Sowe and Avon.

Present: Hon. And Rev J. W. Leigh (chairman) W. Davenport Bromely Esq. M.P. George Jones Esq I.P. Evans Esq, Richard Robbisns Esq Messrs, Weston W. Robbins T. Harris, Power, Carter, Berry & co.

The resolution passed: Owners and occupiers on the banks of the river have and are sustaining from sewage being emptied into the river. It will be impressed upon them the necessity of having the aforesaid nuisance wholly removed or abated.

If the commissioner, appointed by parliament, requesting them to visit, inspect and report upon the Sherbourne, the Sowe and the Avon rivers from the city of Coventry to Warwick Castle – that the committee will visit and preserve that kind of neighbourly feeling which now exists between  inhabitants of the neighbourhood and the city of Coventry. But should they, unfortunately, fail to do so legal steps shall be advised by counsel.

January – The yard and stables of the Kings Head Hotel Coventry to be let with immediate possession. The horses (Blacks and greys) in good working condition; Broughams, cars, hearses, mourning coaches, cabs, omnibus, harness., to be taken by valuation. The yard and stabling are convenient and spacious and there is an old and valuable connection, which may be largely extended. Full particulars with inventory may be had of Mr Thomas Clarke, Auctioneer – Coventry.

December – Kings Head Hotel Coventry post horse, car and cab trades will be carried on as usual, in conjunction with the hotel. An omnibus to meet the trains. Excellent hearses and mourning coaches. Sabin & Co. proprietors are also available.

March – Warwickshire schoolmasters association met at the Kings Head. To discuss the new code of teaching. Mr. J . Steane of Holy Trinity school observed that he had no desire to underrate the value of music being taught in an elementary school, but he thought the code required too much of the teachers and children. If the inspectors were not satifsfied with the manner in which the songs were sung.. If the children’s voices were a little coarse the teacher was called to account!

1876

June 29th – Kings Head Sale on Thursday 

(Sale due to losses on the Stock Exchange)

[Known as the Panic of 1873 – 1877]

A highly important sale of RARE OLD CHINA, finely executed Florentine bronzes, OIL PAINTINGS, curious metal articles from the Spanish revolution and other works of art, the property of a connoisseur reluctantly compelled to dispose of the same owing to recent heavy losses in connection with the stock exchange. 

The sale includes fine specimens of old – Chelsea, Capo di Monte, Delft, Plymouth, Vienna, Frankenthal, Bow, Derby, Spode, oriental, serves, Majolica, Berlin, Dresden, Worcester, Bristol, enamels etc.

March– Notice! Notice! Mr. L. Knight specialist in the Eye and Ear, will attend at the Kings Head Hotel Coventry On Friday, And every alternate Friday for the convenience of his patients in Coventry and Neighbourhood Hours 4.30 to 7 pm Patients will please bring cards and bottles.

1878

Kings Head Hotel

NEW MANAGEMENT

Every accommodation can be obtained there; also that it is intended to make extensive alterations and additions to the hotel with the view of increasing the accommodation and promoting the comfort of those who patronise it. Cabs & Carriages & Posting business carried on as usual.

The Kings Head coaching is transformed into a large Victorian hotel

The Kings Head Hotel

Opens December 1879

January – Kings Head Hotel Company – Livery and Bait Stables Good Stabling & Loose boxes Lock up Coach Houses Open and closed carriages Broughams Landaus Wagonettes, Wedding Carriages Cars and Hansoms Always Ready Orders received at Car Office Kings Head Yard Hertford Street Entrance.

November – Mayor remarks:

“When we look through the city and see the great improvements that have taken place in Broadgate in the giving up of the property and the corporation for the widening of the high street near the bank, the purchase of land and the building of the market hall the setting back of the Kings Head hotel in Smithford street the proposed alterations which will be carried out very quickly in the opening up of west orchard I think we may feel satisfied with ourselves that Coventry is improving”.

December – NOTICE !! King’s Head hotel company – Public Luncheon bar will not open on the 18th Inst 17th December.

more to come..

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Kings Head Hotel

Market Hall & Tower

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Market Hall & Clock Tower

The Coventry Market Hall was built in the 1860s, complete with a clock tower.

It became the beating heart of the city until its destruction in 1940.

1700's

The ‘old’ Market Hall was a relatively small structure situated to the West of Broadgate, between West Orchards and Smithford Street. It was known by some as Solomon’s Temple – apparently named after one of the custodians of the Market building. However important this market building was, the main market was the open air market in Broadgate.

January – Coventry Corporation considers the idea of a new Market Hall

February – Land on Holyhead Road sold off by the Corporation to fund the New Market Hall.

1863

Alderman H Soden –

“The state of Broadgate on Market Days was a disgrace to the city – positively uncivilised!

It had been decided some time ago that the crockery dealers should be restricted to Market Street and the fish sellers to another part.

But lately the crockery dealers have found their way back to the centre of the town and are making a great nuisance of themselves!”

20th August – Queen Victoria gives Royal Assent to the building of the Coventry Market Hall via the Coventry Market Hall Act 1863 

December – The Corporation reports the cost is between £5,000 – £10,000 for the buildings, about £6,000 for the land but that excludes the property already owned by the Corporation. The Clerk then reports a figure of £25,000 to £30,000 for the whole project. [Sounds like he was making it up on the spot!].

January –  An exhibition at St Mary’s Hall of several designs, each comprising of 7-8 drawings. They were all well received by the Corporation and the people of Coventry.

However, the winning design was modified by the Corporation to allow for a Crystal Palace style roof from the second best design. The site chosen will remove a number of old buildings that a strange to the city would hardly believe could exist in the centre of a respectable old place like Coventry.

The primary entrance to the Market Hall will be from West Orchards that will include a row of high-quality shops. The second entrance will be via Market Street. The entrance from Broadgate will be widened with the removal of the City Arms Inn. In all, this will be a marked improvement and benefit to public sanitation.

The ornamental tower, adapted from the fixing of a clock was taken from the winning design was not to be erected immediately due to cost. It may, however, be added with advantage at a future period when the town is more prosperous. It has been proposed that a time ball might be added to its extreme summit instead of the customary wind vane – the watchmakers of the city would see this as a great advantage to be in immediate communication with Greenwich.

September – A suggestion of a ceremony and dinner to mark the laying of the foundation stone was put forward. The motion was not carried and so, never too place.

Contract awarded to Mr W Tomlinson of Coundon – Between 1865 and 1867 the demolition and building work takes place.

Grand Opening

Wednesday 19th June 1867

The Coventry and Midland Manufacturing, Industrial and Art Exhibition 

Local Societies & Associations are invited to take part in a procession on the opening day. 
Notice to exhibitors – no goods will be received after 10th June.
Season tickets (including admission on the opening day) will be ready on and after Monday next.
They will be on sale at the Herald Office & Corn Exchange – Adults 15s, Children 7s 6d.

Two enormous lumps of Coal from Wyken Colliery – each weighing up to two Tons will be standing against the exits.

Numerous models of buildings.

Interesting displays of natural products of minerals and fossils.

A quantity of old armour and guns from Coombe Abbey.

300 Pictures on loan from the Earl of Craven, Earl of Dudley, Earl of Warwick, Lord Leigh, Mr Bromley MP, Mr Wise MP and some treaures from Dr Dewes and Mr Gulson. Rev J W Leigh has provided a selection of water colour drawings. Mr Eaton MP specimens of Alhambra decoration taken from the Alhambra Palace.

Ancient Corporation records will be arranged in cases down the centre.

Valuable assortment of antiquities from Lichfield museum will be on display.

The celebrated Kenilworth Buffett of carved oak will be on display, which formed an attractive object in the great exhibition of 1851 and was afterwards purchased by the inhabitants of Warwick and presented by them to the Earl of Warwick on his marriage. [ The buffet has not moved from Warwick Castle – click here ]

Every Day – the fair fountain will be flowing, pipping Bullfinches & Machinery in Motion, Doors open at 10 o’clock and close at dusk.

The Exhibition will be open every Saturday afternoon after 2pm for the WORKING CLASS at six pence each.

[To the musical profession – a gentlemen required to act as organist and pianist at the Coventry Exhibition, also six instrumentalists for the quadrille band – apply at the market hall]

  • Right Honourable Lord Leigh
  • Lord Lieutenant of Warwickshire
  • The Right Honourable the Earl of Clarendon
  • K.G. James Marriott
  • Esq Mayor of Coventry
  • The Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Worcester
  • The Right Honourable Lord Lyttelton
  • Lord Lieutenant of Worcester
  • The Right Honourable the Earl of Aylesford
  • The Right Honourable Earl Howe
  • The Mayors of Tamworth, Lichfield, Nottingham, Derby and Stratford, Captain Adams
  • Rev. J.H.Iles (Wolverhampton)
  • Rev. R.H. Baynes (Coventry)
  • Rev. S.H Wilddrington
  • Rev. Dr Temple, Rev. A.W. Wilson (Coventry)
  • Rev. E.E. Delf (Coventry)

July – Shilling days – Monday, Tuesdays Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Half Crown Days – Thursdays. Children Half Price, Season Tickets down to 10s.

August – ‘Everyone should read Mrs Brown’s Trip to the Exhibition at Coventry priced at two pence published by Mr W. Fred of Taunton’.

Exhibition Prize Medal – The committee of the Coventry Exhibition hereby offer a prize of £5 for the best design for a medal to be given o the successful exhibitors.

1st November – Starnurer Howkin – DRUNK and DISORDERLY! in Market Street – The prisoner pleaded guilty and expressed his regret for the offence. The bench discharged him with a fine of 2s 6d in the poor box.

20th November – The letting of Market Hall Shops and pitches will start at 12 o’clock promptly. The sale of ale, porter, wines or spirits will not be permitted in any part of the market hall.

2nd December – Market Traders OUTRAGE! They are now paying four times the rents they did in Broadgate. They make a request o the Mayor and Aldermen that they can trade each of the first five evenings of the month until 8 pm with the use of free gas light.

Saturday 30th November 1867

Last Open Air Market in Broadgate

Under the Coventry Market Hall Act 1863 – Any person other than a licensed hawker, who sell’s or exposes for sale in any pace in this city expect his own dwelling place or shop will be liable to be a penalty not exceeding forty shillings.

This will come into effect on Monday 2nd December 1867.

July – Property on Broadgate bought by the Corporation to be demolished to make a wide access to the Market.

November – The roof of the market hall is leaking. The market committee say they have painted it as best they can but can never guarantee that it will never be watertight.

September – Mr Kemp’s celebrated Hal Green Cabbage Plants available at Coventry Market Hall on Friday 21st and the following two Fridays. Orders left at the White horse will be punctually attended to.

The Market Hall is struggling to make any money, with most of it empty. The Corporation suggests moving the Butcher’s from Butcher’s Row into the Market Hall.  Another suggestion was to mothball the main hall and only use the outdoor area and the minor hall. Neither idea are carried out.

[A white elephant in the making?]

1870

Tower & Clock Opened to the Public

Mr E T Loseby won the contract for the clock and was awarded £308 10s but owing to Mr Losbey’s desire to make the clock as perfect as possible, it is believed to have cost him in the region of £600.

A clause in the contract – for every second the clock varied over 1 second the winner of the contract would forfeit £1. The clock was to be wound once per week. The clock was finsihed by June 1870.

[Years later the clock was described as the second best public clock mechanism in the UK, second only to that of Big Ben]

October – Billingsgate language that is begin used by the fish stalls is untenable! can anything be done to abate this nuisance?

11th June – The Coventry Midlands Fancier’s Society – first annual meeting show of pointing and other dogs. Schedule of prizes can be obtained from Mr J W Mills 73 Little Park Street. Entries to be made by 25th May 1879.

June – Post of custodian of the Market Clock – responsible for winding and regulating the clock, salary of £10 per annum. terminable by three months notice on either side.

19th November – A group of men watched the clock awaiting the electrical signal from Greenwich, so that watches could be compared and if need be rectified. Mr Samuel Corbett of Smithford Street is in charge of the clock – along with many clocks in the Coventry area for factories and mansions. 85 steps to the clock and a further 30 to the roof where the bell is located which strikes on the hour. The summit of the tower also carries the wires which are connected to the time signal from far below.

The maker E.T. Loseby of Leicester was born in 1817, a son of a clockmaker. Bullet holes observed in the clock face – the crack from them is monitored with dates recorded next to marks – the first is 31st May 1912. The latest was recorded as the 6th June 1914 which reached the rim and is now turning back on itself. [Who knows why the didn’t like the clock to shoot it?]

Four gas lamps make the clock face visible which are lite automatically at 6:30 pm. The clock tower is 100ft high, diameter 5ft wide, numbers are 91/2 inches, minutes are 1 1/2 inches, minutes 2ft 10 1/2 inches with a breath of swell of 5 inches and an hour hand 2ft  1/2 inches long with a breath of swell 5 1/2 inches. The bell is 10 cwt and is struck by two hammers alternatively 25 lbs each with a fall of 5 inches. The weight driving the striking part is 450 lbs and the hand motion weight is 150 lbs. Each of the large weights has a clear feet of 40 feet in eight days.

1916

“The Magistrate expressed the opinion that the Market Hall should make better protection against small boys!”

August – Four boys aged nine to eleven were brought before the magistrates charged with Larceny. Arthur Edgar Longbottom (Aged 10, 6 Bully Yard), Peter Hogan (Aged 10, 17 Greyfriar’s Lane), William Ball (Aged 9, 34 Warwick Lane), Joseph Ball (Aged 9 Greyfriary’s Lane) all scholars of Chyelsmore school.

Accused of stealing twenty-seven pocket knives, three sets of feeler gauges – the property of Edward Norton an ironmonger who has a stall in the Market Hall. Along with ten shillings worth of chocolate belonging to Thomas Herbert Glenn who also has a stall in the Market.

The spikes on the bottom of the arcade were forded away between Thursday evening and Friday morning. The boys all pleaded guilty. The parents of the boys had acted very well and took every precaution to see that their boys told the truth.

The boys had hidden the items in a partly demolished house in Greyfriars Lane, where they had been playing. The defendants were bound over the probation of offenders Act to be of good behaviour for twelve months.

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Market Hall & Tower